Making San Francisco safer one step at a time.

On March 6, 2014, Mayor Lee joined City partners including the SFMTA, Planning Department, Department of Public Health, Department of Public Works and the Controller’s Office in presenting the recommendations of WalkFirst, a first-of-its-kind initiative in the United States to improve pedestrian safety in San Francisco. Tasked with creating a strategic framework to identify and deliver pedestrian projects and programs in San Francisco, WalkFirst has combined  public engagement with technical and statistical analysis of where and why pedestrian collisions occur on our city streets, and updated knowledge about the effectiveness and costs of various engineering measures proven to reduce pedestrian collisions. As a result, WalkFirst has now provided the City with a roadmap of urgently needed pedestrian safety projects and programs over the next five years and the toolbox of measures that can be leveraged to reduce serious pedestrian injuries and fatalities. The City is now ready to leverage $17 million to improve pedestrian safety at 170 high-priority locations identified by WalkFirst over the next five years. The Mayor’s Transportation Task Force recommends that up to $50 million be available for this program. WalkFirst is part of the City’s larger Vision Zero program, a goal to eliminate serious pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the City in the next 10 years.

Though WalkFirst outreach has concluded, please use our participate page to continue to inform planners and engineers of your safety priorities. As projects evolve, the City will continue to use your input to shape and inform proposals.

 

Getting Started
Participate
Safety is our goal.
Public input for this round of project prioritization has ended.  Thanks for your feedback!  We'll be repeating this process in the next couple of years, so any feedback we receive before then will be incorporated into future rounds of analysis. See how your funding decisions impact overall project cost, implementation time, and effectiveness in reducing collisions.  Go directly to the participation page to start using it, or visit our other sections to become more informed regarding WalkFirst.
Streets
Patterns and strategies.
High injury corridors are streets where high numbers of pedestrian injuries occurred between 2005 and 2011.
Tools
Collision Factors tell the story.
By analyzing the factors that contribute to pedestrian injuries and deaths, WalkFirst will identify the pedestrian safety improvements (e.g. – pedestrian countdown signals, corner bulbs, etc.) that are most likely to improve the safety conditions of a given intersection or street. For example, if speed is found to be the leading factor on a street, WalkFirst may recommend the installation of speed humps or a road diet to reduce speed.
Summary
Your Feedback Matters.
Compare your recommendations with those of other San Franciscans on this page. WalkFirst used your feedback to help us better understand your priorities for what we can do improve pedestrian safety. The City has allocated $17M in funding available over the next 5 years for pedestrian safety capital improvements. The WalkFirst Investment Strategy will make capital improvement recommendations each budget year to work towards the City’s goal of reducing serious pedestrian related injuries and fatalities by 50% in 7 years.
WalkFirst Steps:
  • Public Outreach & Engagement
    November 2013–January 2014
    Public Outreach & Engagement
    November 2013–January 2014
    From mid-November 2013 through January 2014, WalkFirst engaged in a citywide public outreach process to gather feedback about pedestrian safety improvements. The primary method for feedback was the interactive online tool. In addition, we held a series of ten targeted focus groups to hear from populations and neighborhoods most impacted by pedestrian injuries and fatalities.
  • Technical Analysis and Overview
    December 2013–January 2014
    Technical Analysis and Overview
    December 2013–January 2014
    From December 2013 to January 2014, WalkFirst reviewed existing City crash data, documented findings, analyzed risk factors that cause collisions and studied which countermeasures are most cost effective at improving safety conditions for people walking.
  • Draft Initial Pedestrian Safety Improvements
    January 2014
    Draft Initial Pedestrian Safety Improvements
    January 2014
    In January 2014, WalkFirst analyzed the existing data and the public feedback received from the community outreach process to prioritize safety improvements. The improvements will account for neighborhood injury inequities and address walking conditions for seniors and people with disabilities.
  • SFMTA Adopts List of Improvements
    February 2014
    SFMTA Adopts List of Improvements
    February 2014
    In February 2014, WalkFirst will be presented its recommendations for pedestrian safety capital improvements to the SFMTA Commission for approval and inclusion in the FY2014/15 capital improvement plan. The WalkFirst Investment Strategy will be making capital improvement recommendations each budget year to work towards the City’s goal of reducing serious pedestrian related injuries and fatalities by 50% in 7 years.
  • Funding for Pedestrian Safety Improvements
    July 2014
    Funding for Pedestrian Safety Improvements
    July 2014
    The City has allocated $17M in funding available over the next 5 years for pedestrian safety capital improvements and the WalkFirst Investment Strategy will be making capital improvement recommendations each budget year to work towards the City’s goal of reducing serious pedestrian related injuries and fatalities by 50% in 7 years.